A REVERENCE FOR WOOD ERIC SLOANE PDF

A Reverence for Wood [Eric Sloane] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The special knowledge of which wood is suited to which task, the. A Reverence for Wood has ratings and 39 reviews. Jim said: I’ve read this several times as a standalone, the latest as the last book in Eric Sloane’s. A countryman with a penchant for country things (cf. Eric Sloane’s Almanac and Weather Forecaster, Folklore of American Weather, etc.) proceeds at the pace of .

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Return to Book Page. A Reverence for Wood by Eric Sloane.

This refreshing and delightfully written book underscores the important role that wood has played in the development of American life and culture. Charmingly illustrated with author Eric Sloane’s own sketches, the text illuminates with rare insight the enormously varied and useful qualities of wood.

Covering such topics as the aesthetics of wood, aa implements, and carp This refreshing and delightfully written book underscores the important role that wood has played in the development of American slane and culture.

Covering such topics as the aesthetics of wood, wooden implements, and carpentry, Sloane remarks expansively and with affection on the resourcefulness of early Americans in their use of this precious commodity. From cradle to coffin, the pioneer was surrounded by wood.

Questions?

It was used to make tools, fence the land, and build barns. People sat at wooden tables on wooden chairs and ate from wooden dishes. Charcoal, one of the many by-products of wood, was used to preserve meat, remove offensive odors, and produce ink. The bark of various trees was processed to make medicine.

An entertaining, factual, and historically accurate book, A Reverence for Wood will delight woodcrafters and lovers of Americana. It is “one of Eric Sloane’s best books. Paperbackpages. Published February 18th by Dover Publications first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about A Reverence for Woodplease sign up.

Lists with This Book. Dec 19, Jim rated it it was amazing Shelves: I’ve read this several times as a standalone, the latest as the last book in Eric Sloane’s Sketches of America Pastwhich is actually 3 of his books in one. My review of it is here: This book delves into some interesting history of Colonial America. Th I’ve read this several times as a standalone, the latest as the last book in Eric Sloane’s Sketches of America Pastwhich is actually 3 of his books in one.

The last dozen pages or so are fantastic. The last section of this book is one of the best for someone new to identifying trees, filled with Sloane’s wonderful sketches that quickly show identifying features.

I can’t rate this objectively, because I always associate it with my father. I used to read it when visiting my parents; my Dad’s not much of a reader, but he is a carpenter and owns several Sloane books. Finally I’ve decided to reread and review for GR But I do think it’s a five-star book for almost everyone.

It’s short, fascinating, gracefully written, delightfully illustrated, and valuable. Even though I’m not a carpenter or woodsman myself, even though I have very little interest in histo I can’t rate this objectively, because I always associate it with my father. Even though I’m not a carpenter or woodsman myself, even though I have very little interest in history per se, I have been charmed this and several others by Sloane several times.

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A REVERENCE FOR WOOD by Eric Sloane | Kirkus Reviews

Jan 28, Katie rated it liked it Shelves: In this book, Eric Sloane extols all the wondrous virtues of wood. From deconstructed foe planks, to the handles of tools, charcoal, and the living cells of trees, he loves it all.

He relates many stories of how wood was used in the Americas, both by Native Americans and early European settlers. As always, I love Sloane’s appreciation for the past and longing for simplicity. One of my favorite parts is when Sloane talks about the old barn door he uses for a kitchen table because he loves the wo In this book, Eric Sloane extols all the wondrous virtues of wood.

One of my favorite parts is when Sloane talks about the old barn door he uses for a kitchen table because he loves the wood so much. He talks about sitting at his table, eating breakfast, and musing over all the stories the wood could tell.

The scratches near the latch where a farmer must have lit a match for a pipe, the scratches of a dog jumping slaone the door, the nail where a wreath may have hung. It reminded me of an old table I got at a thrift store. It obviously belonged to a family with children. The wood was soft, so there were indentations from math homework done at the tables, names written on the table, and some other things. It had a lot sloabe character and I often spend my meals wondering about the family that had previously owned the table.

I very much relate to the pleasure Sloane finds in reflecting on the history of particular objects and imagining all the people who have either played a role in creating the object, or used q in one way or another. I really like Sloane’s illustrations too. They helped me understand how charcoal is made, how to identify some trees, and how a birch bark canoe is made. Some parts were a little tedious, so it wasn’t my favorite Sloane book, but still worth a read.

Jan 31, Dorie rated it it was amazing Shelves: I came across Eric Sloane’s books when I was a teenage wanna-be author researching a book set in early America. Well, reading through Sloane’s books I enjoyed the research so much I never actually got around to writing the story.

His books are wonderful descriptions of everyday life in this young country, and his penciled illustrations are absolutely wonderful and informative. I collect all his books now, and pick them up when I find them. Nov 05, Stephen rated it it was amazing Shelves: Stellar illustrations and a unique historical narrative. Many lessons to be passed from author dor reader in this one.

A reverence for wood – Eric Sloane – Google Books

Jul 16, Brooks rated it fpr it. I knew she was a master gardener, but did not realize how important tress were to her. She had dozens of tree books including this one. I read it to get closer to my mother. It basically provides vignettes of American forests at year increments back in time. What was the forest used for and how it shaped people living in the area.

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Reading this book reminded me of being a boy and the fascination I had with woodlore and woodcraft in my youth. I really enjoyed reading this; it took me back to those times and made me feel feelings that I had forgotten. It made me feel a certain Dec 26, Paul rated it really liked it. A short introduction to the history of wood use in America.

Folksy philosophy and fun anecdotes make for an easy, informative read. May 25, Hilary rated egic it was amazing Shelves: Jan 28, Matthew rated it it was amazing. Jul 19, Zack rated it it was amazing. Quick read, lots of information and entertaining. Oct 20, Stephen Marchesani reveremce it really liked it. Nostalgic, insightful, and spiritual. Jul 14, Shaun rated it liked it Recommended sloanf Shaun by: This book is a short meander reverenec a mythical America where relaxed pioneers worried primarily about how to use trees and shared scripted conversations with each other that mirror Hanna-Barbera cartoons.

Sloane has reserved a special place in his heart for wooden tools, and this book owod a reverejce of what European settlers managed to do with all the trees they found here once they cut them down – that is, before metal came in and ruined everything.

I enjoyed this, despite it’s rose-colored-p This book is a short meander though a mythical America where relaxed pioneers worried primarily about how to use trees and shared scripted conversations with each other that mirror Hanna-Barbera cartoons.

I enjoyed this, despite it’s rose-colored-past theme. The author’s illustrations make up the real meat of the book, and the back end has a great guide to tree identification which I am horrible at.

The drawings are plain and beautiful, and would hang well on a wall by themselves. I kept staring at his pen work in admiration Sloane is a painter, and interestingly enough touts Masonite as a substitute for canvas or wood as a medium!

Despite my tone here, I really learned quite a bit from this book and enjoyed it quite a bit. It’s also a quick read – provided you’re ready eic take it for what it is and ignore Sloane’s narrow and blunderingly misogynistic interpretation of a brief period in the history of European settlement in North America. Oct 22, Daniel rated it really liked it. It includes numerous easily digestible meditations and anecdotes related to our nation’s historical reliance on lumber.

The prose is noticeably nostalgic and peppered with pleasant illustrations. Personally, my favorite part of the book was a small reflection on barn roofing in New England, which intentionally left wooe protruding in order to keep snow from falling off. The idea, apparently, was that snow was actually warmer than the winter air and would actually keep the place at a more agreeable temperature! Granted, this seems to clash with my brief experience in Vermont, where roofs consistently sat at a severe slope in order to shed snow accumulation.

Then again, there were different times. I would definitely recommend A Reverance for Wood for those who are somewhat sentimental and perhaps foolishly romantic about rural history and living.