BREAST STORIES BY GAYATRI CHAKRAVORTY SPIVAK PDF

Results 1 – 16 of 16 As Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak points out in her introduction, the breast is far more than a symbol in these stories. It becomes the means of a. As Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak points out in her introduction, the breast is far more than a symbol in these stories – it is the means of harshly indicting an. This cluster of short fiction has a common motif: the breast. As Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak points out in her introduction, the breast is far more than a symbol in.

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Breast Stories by Mahasweta Devi

Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Breast Stories by Mahasweta Devi. Breast Stories by Mahasweta Devi. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak Translator. In “Draupadi”, the protagonist, Dopdi Mejhen, is a tribal revolutionary, who, arrested and gang-raped in custody, turns the terrible wounds of her breast into a counter-offensive, In “Breast-giver”, a woman who becomes a professional wet nurse to support her family, dies of painful breast cancer, betrayed alike by the breasts that had for years been her chief identity and the dozens of ‘sons’ she had suckled.

In “Behind the Bodice”, migrant labourer Gangor’s ‘statuesque’ breasts excite the attention of ace photographer Upin Puri, triggering off a train of violence that ends in tragedy.

Spivak introduces this cycle of ‘breast stories’ with thought-provoking essays which probe the texts of the stories, opening them up to a complex of interpretation and meaning. Paperbackpages. Published November 15th by Seagull Books first published February 1st To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Breast Storiesplease sign up.

Lists with This Book. Aug 09, Sita rated it it was amazing Shelves: Mahasweta Devi passed away just a few weeks ago, and I am simply devastated. Her stories are stunning and full of off-kilter yet sharp observations on the lives of Indian women. They are funny, in that wicked way of hers and yet full of pain and a feral sort of horror.

This woman should be read by all of us, and her warnings must be heeded. I hope to live to see her stories become part of the collective conscience of my country. May 19, Chitra Divakaruni rated it it was amazing Shelves: A powerful and courageous writer, Mahasweta Devi writes it like it is. These stories lodged inside me like gold thorns, reminding me of the plights of my sisters trapped in patriarchal structures that they themselves sometimes have strengthened, and my responsibility toward them.

I recognized the deep human truth of these stories. I think you will, too. Kafka says, A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us. This is such a book. Jan 15, Nikhil rated it it was amazing Shelves: The contrast between Devi and Indian Women authors who write primarily for Western audiences cannot be more stark.

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Devi lays bare the bleak realities of poor women, with particular interest paid to tribal and migrant women — peoples as marginal within the idea of india as you can get. Her vy condemn all of us as morally complicit in the horrifying gender-violence these women’s social existence inevitably leads to. Spivak’s essays for ‘Draupadi’ and ‘Behind the Bodice’ are amazing stories.

Spivak’s essays for the first and third story are illuminating and facilitated my understanding of the texts.

Her essay for the second story was, in true Spivak style, 50 pages of egregiously pedantic and crushingly literary analysis that, sadly, went way over my head. Feb 09, Jess rated it really liked it. This is well worth a read for Spivak’s extended commentary alone, much of which builds on her famous ‘Can the Subaltern Speak? At first, I gzyatri the translation was a little clunky, especially as Spivak has been criticised for an unnecessarily complicated writing style.

However, her helpful notes made clear the reasoning behind translation choices, in particular the difficulties of replicating Bengali dialect and changes in meaning as a result of linguistic changes. Much of it is quite This is well worth a read for Spivak’s extended commentary alone, much of which builds on her famous ‘Can the Subaltern Chakrvaorty Much of it is quite dense, but is interesting as an exploration of the possibility of subaltern agency and the limits of postcolonial criticism.

Aug 17, Jessica Russell rated it it was amazing.

Book Review: Breast Stories by Mahasweta Devi, A Metaphor For Exploitation

Mahasweta Devi’s Breast Stories is a translation from either bengali or hindi The reading can be a bit rough in some places with the loose translations, however the message and stories that are revealed are unforgettable. It is important to note that all three of the stories in this collection are about 3 different women and their breasts.

If you can get over the translation the stories are very straight forward and extremely graphic. Aug 02, Saurabh rated it it was amazing. Moving, Sad and Powerful. Oct 03, Vidhi Bansal rated it really liked it. Breazt Devi’s stories truly sensitize you to real issues with the help of her candid and powerful stories.

The book also has essays on the translators take on the the authors work, which gives a deeper understanding on the constant rift of traditions and modernity in India. Sep 13, Gunjan rated it really liked it Shelves: Although Gayatri has tried her best, I understand that the nuances of the language and emotions get lost in translation. The book also includes cultural essays written by Gayatri as bby to the three short tales.

There are unsaid metaphors and how ‘the woman’s breast’ is the connecting thread in each of the unrelated tales. There are social mores of the Indian middle class or the rural illiterate fugit I read a translation by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak as Mahasweta Devi writes in Bengali.

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There are social mores of the Indian middle class or the rural illiterate fugitive, jungian and freudian concepts at play and the characters very strongly etched out. An impressive and powerful body of work and Chakravoryt lament the fact that I cannot read Bangla to be able to enjoy these pieces in their originality.

Powerful, yes, but Spivak’s babbling in my translation made it nearly unbearable. However, my main criticism is that every part of the story leading up to the bottom half of the last page was irrelevant. It just wasn’t as powerful as it should have been, but only for me. I wouldn’t disagree with people who applaud Devi, like I would consider doing when concerning other authors.

Aug 11, Ritambhara Dixit rated it liked it. Great cluster of stories with an unusual theme. Jun 06, Advait rated it it was amazing. Skip Spivak’s pedantic ‘introductory’ essays and read the stories thrice over instead.

Jun 11, Ramachandran Venkataraman added it. View all 4 comments. Lily rated it it was ok Jul 18, Vaishnavi Netha rated it did not like it May 22, Sayanty Chatterjee rated it it was amazing Jan 03, Jessica rated it it was amazing Jul 16, Bewitchingly Paranoid rated it really liked it Mar 20, Ashok Banker rated it it was amazing Aug 18, Hastwala Mohit rated it it was ok Aug 08, Shirley Jarvis rated it liked it Oct 23, Gungun Jaiswal rated it it was amazing Oct 14, Mrinalini Dayal rated it liked it Oct 30, Nikita Joseph rated it really liked it Sep 22, Naaz Chima rated it it was ok Jan 22, Katrina rated it it was amazing May 24, Aparanjitha rated it it was amazing May 30, Babita rated it it was amazing Sep 05, Alex rated it liked it Aug 15, JS rated it really liked it Jul 12, Alpana Gupta rated it it was amazing Oct 08, Incorrect book title 2 Jan 14, Mahasweta Devi was an Indian social activist and writer.

She was born in in Dhaka, to literary parents in a Hindu Brahmin family.

Her father Manish Ghatak was a well-known poet and novelist of the Kallol era, who used the pseudonym Jubanashwa. Mahasweta’s mother Dharitri Devi was also a writer and a social worker. Hons in English, and then finished an M. Inshe gave birth to Nabarun Bhattacharya, currently one of Bengal’s and India’s leading novelist whose works are noted for their intellectual vigour and philosophical flavour.

She got divorced from Bijon Bhattacharya in Inshe began teaching at Bijoygarh College an affiliated college of the University of Calcutta system. During those days, Bijoygarh College was an institution for working class women students.